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Five Fabulous Mobile Email Marketing Strategy For Aspiring Marketers (Infographic)

Nowadays, emails are being opened on mobile devices, not PC.

Most people generally bring their smartphone or tablet within reach at all times, so it stands to reason we’d prefer checking them for emails rather than log onto a desktop. This presents online marketers with a great opportunity for increasing open rates and ultimately boosting the success of their campaigns. Especially given that research found that just 34% of companies just have the ‘basics for mobile optimisation in place’. If you’re not optimising your campaigns for mobile devices, then you could be seriously falling behind the others.

With that in mind, here is the infographic containing five top tips which should help you optimise your email campaigns for mobile devices:

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Infographic credit: Salesforce.

Combining Email & Social Media Marketing to Get More Customers

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There are mysterious forces in the world of marketing. The techniques that once stood alone are coming together to form powerful alliances.

Although some experts still proclaim that one has mastery over the other, the most savvy small businesses are seeking to harness the power of email marketing and social media marketing at the same time.

Well, the good news is you can do the same things. Just follow these simple steps you can do to maximize your marketing efforts using email and social media together.

1. Link back to your website from your social profiles and your newsletter

The smart way to do this is to link to a specific landing page on your site, rather than your homepage. Think about why your social follower wants to visit your site and give them what they’re looking for as soon as they arrive.

2. Post on social media about your newsletter or email update

Use a tool like our Simple Share function to automatically post to your Facebook, Twitter, and LinkedIn accounts when your newsletter is published. It’s totally customisable and on LinkedIn and Facebook you can include a picture, too.

3. Encourage newsletter readers to share your email with their networks

You want more readers who are like your current readers, so tap into their networks by asking them to share your newsletter. Two great ways to do that are with our Sharebar and using Click To Tweet.

4. Include links to your social profiles in your newsletter

Don’t just shove a social icon on your newsletter, tell people why they should follow you. Is it for articles, quotes, discounts, jokes, or something else? They will want to know.

5. Invite your newsletter subscribers to connect with you on Facebook

When you launch a new social campaign, tell your subscribers with a single purpose email. Tell them why  they should “Like” your Page and give them a deadline for the freebie to be over.

6. Let social subscribers know when your email is coming out

The day before your email newsletter is due, post an update on Twitter, Facebook, and LinkedIn to let people know what’s going to be in it, and that there’s still time to sign up. Don’t forget to give them a link to your sign-up page (not your homepage).

7. Use a mailing list sign-up app on your Facebook Page

Constant Contact has an app called Join My Mailing List. If people come to your Facebook Page and they are interested in what you do, you can nab them for your email list whilst they’re there, by encouraging them to sign up on your Page itself. I recommend you customise the app thumbnail to match your brand and alter the default text to tell people WHY they should join (e.g. “Get Offers Here First”).

8. Pin your newsletters on Pinterest

Go to your newsletter archive and view your latest newsletter. Now pick out a key image from your newsletter and pin it to one of your Pinterest boards. THEN (and this is the important bit), link it back to your archived newsletter. It will give you extra exposure and some nice SEO (Search Engine Optimisation) benefits, too.

9. Use content snippets from your newsletter on Twitter and Facebook, and link them back to your email archive

Yes, here’s another one using your archive. The easiest way to post your content snippets is to schedule them using a tool like Timely.is or MarketMeSuite. You can post several to go out over the next few days all in one go. To make the most of your archive, remember to include a nice clear “Join My List” button on your newsletter, so that if someone lands there from one of these snippets (or Pinterest, etc.), they can see how to sign up immediately.

10. Include social media snippets in your newsletter

If you really want to encourage newsletter subscribers to connect with you on social media, try taking screenshots of good engagement that you’ve had on social media channels (like Twitter and Facebook) and use the Microsoft Snipping Tool, or something like Snagit, to take a picture of some of those great messages and include them in your newsletter. This works particularly well if you pair it with a call to action, as call to action success rates are greatly increased if you pair them with a testimonial.

11. Put email and social media marketing plans on a common calendar, and create themes of content on all channels

The smart thing to do is to use your marketing emails (like your newsletter) and your social media updates to reinforce each other by running common themes through all channels. All this means is that you talk about related things on all your social media accounts and emails, during a set time period, e.g. your blog has a how-to article about your theme, on Facebook you post some client examples of how you’ve helped people do that thing, and on Twitter you post a daily fact about that topic.

You can get more useful hints about email marketing from The Website Marketing Group team here. If you want to get started with the email marketing without tears, feel free to enquire now.

15 Email Marketing Myths Debunked (Infographic)

 

 

 

 

Email marketing is one of the most favourable tools for most online marketers. Unfortunately, most of them are still trapped on the various old beliefs concerning email marketing.

There are many myths that surround email marketing. Adding “FREE” in the subject line will not impact your deliverability rate anymore. Same thing  with the assumption that Monday mornings are the best time to send your emails.

Email marketing works differently for different brands and industries. The following infographic will bust some of the most dominating myths of email marketing and proposes some practical tips that really work.

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Infographic credit: Email Monks.

 

 

Opening Line: How To Craft A Good Email Subject (Infographic)

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Your email’s subject line is the most important factor that decides whether it will be opened or not.

It is the first impression you have on your recipient. Sadly, most people get a lot of emails everyday and  most of them are left unopened. The chances of your email being ignored are pretty high, unless you have a trustworthy and appealing subject line.

Your subject line is the first (and the last) impression on users. In many cases, your email subject line is more important than the body. After all, a great newsletter is worthless if it never sees the light of day.

There are a few different views when it comes to creating terrific subject lines. Here is a great infographic to create a killer subject lines for your emails:

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9 Email Subject Tips To Boost Your Open Rates

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How many unread emails do you have in your inbox?

Most people get a lot of emails everyday and  most of them are left unopened. The chances of your email being ignored are pretty high, unless you have a trustworthy and appealing subject line.

Your subject line is the first (and the last) impression on users. In many cases, your email subject line is more important than the body. After all, a great newsletter is worthless if it never sees the light of day.

There are a few different views when it comes to creating terrific subject lines. Here are nine different types of effective email subject lines that you can adapt to your next campaign:

1. Simple Subject Lines

There’s a lot to be said for minimalism, as users need you to be clear and concise in your subject lines. Time is always a good asset.

Recently, MailChimp conducted an email subject line study and found that short, descriptive subject lines fare better than cheesy ones. Some might argue that humor and creativity should be avoided when creating good subject lines for emails, especially since many marketing experts say otherwise. The succinct, to-the-point approach is most applicable with notification emails, in which a user already has a connection with the content you’re delivering.

Most of these subject line examples involve updates or notifications connected with a user’s social media activity, order status, etc. These emails have a specific purpose, and so the subject lines should be specific as well.

2. Funny Subject Lines

A humorous subject line can really stick out among the dry, dull emails surrounding it. On the other hand, humor is a touchy thing. It thrives on exclusivity, which isn’t always great if you’re trying to appeal to the masses. Still, if you know your audience inside out and your emails are well-targeted, an appropriate joke can get your email opened and earn major reputation points with audiences on your wavelength.

Some funny email subject line examples:

  • Please Touch Me! Enterprise Delight via Multitouch
  • Defense Against the Dark Arts: ESAPI
  • Do Gamers Dream of HTML5 Sheep?
  • LEAN STARTUP: Baby Got (Feed)Back – Putting the Lean in Learn

Bear in mind that the cleverness of the other funny email subject lines might be lost on some users who didn’t attend Hogwarts or haven’t read Philip K. Dick’s “Do Androids Dream Of Electric Sheep?”. Always find your niche and make the recipients laugh, not scratch their head.

3. Controversial/Shocking Email Subject Lines

Sometimes controversy sells, and it most certainly grabs attention. Using shock, controversy, or insult in your subject lines requires you to tread really carefully. You may get opens, but at the cost of customers. This strategy requires you to be confident in your understanding of your audience’s tastes and perceptions. It’s a gambling move, but the pay-off can be pretty great. Here are some examples:

  • Everyone Is Gay: Social Media As Social Action
  • Why Your 5-Year-Old Is More Digital Than Most CMOs
  • Your Marketing Sucks: Why You Need to Think Local

4. Single-Word Subject Lines

One effective email subject line strategy involves going ultra-minimalist with one-word subject lines.

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From a simple design perspective, you can see why the Amazon Local subject line catches the eye – its length and shape stand out from the other largely similar-looking structures. Here is a good example:

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Another great email subject line example comes from Mequoda with the simple subject line of:

  • Panic

It’s just a single word, but it’s an emotionally huge one. What should I be panicking about? Am I in danger? What’s going on? Am I having an existential crisis? Emotionally-walloping words make a big impression.

5. Email Subject Lines with Numbers & Lists

Many of the factors that make up a good blog post title also make a good email subject line. Incorporating numbers into your subject line attracts attention, as our brains are naturally drawn to digits. This tends to be why top 10 lists are so successful – lists are easier for our brains to process and they create curiosity, in addition to providing the promise of a quick and easy read.

  • SocialBro – 7 most annoying Twitter moments of the #Oscars2014
  • YouTube – 10 jaw-dropping drift videos on YouTube
  • Pinterest Partner Team – 3 ways to improve your Pins

Numbers and list email subject lines stand out for the same reasons that one-word subject lines or unusual punctuation do – they are visually jarring.

6. Personalised Subject Lines

Incorporating personalisation techniques into email subject lines is another way to increase open rates. However, incorporating a user’s name into the subject line becomes trivial these days, as this has become the common practice that many users consider these emails as spam. Instead, try location-specific offers and language, or interest targeting. LivingSocial and Groupon are old pros at this, sending emails with subject lines promoting deals in your area.

  • LivingSocial Deals – Best of Boston: Avanti Salon & More
  • LivingSocial Deals – Don’t miss out – Two-Hour Private Glassblowing Class for Two People

The subject line above combines personalisation (via remarketing) with scarcity to create an effective email subject line. In a broader sense, it’s good practice to understand your audience well enough to know what language, style, and offers will be attractive to them.

7. Questions & Other Punctuation in Email Subject Lines

Question marks and unusual punctuation offer another method for standing out from the email masses. Exclamation marks can be useful, but are so over-used in subject lines that they don’t tend to be very powerful. Instead, experiment with some fun symbols or loud punctuation to attract their eyeballs.

  • Coldwater Creek – Going…going…70% off Ultimate Sale is almost gone!
  • VUDU-Movies & TV – *RENT “Frozen” . Watch it today in 2D or 3D. *
  • HAILO Boston – We ? You

Asking your readers a question, as opposed to a standard statement, immediately engages them. Questions enter an instant dialogue with users, making them more likely to be opened.

  • Sephora Beauty Insider – Rough day?
  • Banana Republic – Final hours! Will you save 50%?

Above, Banana Republic combines a question with scarcity tactics. Sephora asks an emotionally-engaging question (really? you care?) with just two words, creating a truly great subject line.

8. “Missing Out” & Other Scarcity Tactics in Subject Lines

People have a deep, inherent terror of being left behind, of missing out. This flock mentality was a survival instinct once, but now it’s just another subject line strategy to goad us into a purchase. Email subject lines threatening scarcity (limited time offer!) tend to perform well, and this language is also common practice with squeeze pages. People will commit some pretty cold actions to avoid “missing out.” Yup, we’ve all got a serious case of the fear of missing outs. Throw in some scarcity words and you may be surprised how your click rates will change.

  • Bundle Stars – Pay $1.99 for a new bundle of 6 STEAM games (48 HOURS ONLY!)
  • Coldwater Creek – Ends Today! 36 Hour Outlet Sale. Hurry, this is your last chance…
  • Coldwater Creek – 5 HOURS ONLY! 50% off ALL Jeans in Stores. GO!

Examples above incorporate numbers, scarcity, punctuation, and partial capitalisation (emphasis on the partial) for some serious subject line success.

9. Mysterious Email Subject Lines

People dig a little mystery in their lives. Giving readers a little taste of something intriguing might cause them to bite…

  • ePrize – It’s all over December 25…

Email Subject Line Best Practices

Here are some tips for creating good email subject line for you to keep in mind:

  • Write multiple subject lines. You should write 10 subject lines for every email, just as you should write 10 titles for every blog post. Then choose the best one.
  • Keep it under 50 characters. It’s general best practice to keeps subject lines to fewer than 50 characters. Subject lines with less than 50 characters have higher open rates and click-through-rates than those with 50+. Go over 50 characters and you risk being cut o-.
  • Alliteration. An ample amount of alliteration attracts! Give it a try for some catchy email subject lines.
  • More caps is not equal to more opens. Covering your subject line in caps WILL NOT HELP YOU. Caps are powerful, but not to be trifled with. Use them sparingly and responsibly, like grenades.
  • Knowing your audience. Your best bet for creating good email subject lines will be understanding your audience intimately and catering to them. This is a major rule for pretty much all aspects of online marketing, and while it can be a bit tougher in a limited character field like a subject line, matching your audience’s interests and mannerisms is essential if you really want solid open rates.
  • Knowing your tone. Most good email subject lines rely on a conversationalist tone to attract readers. Sites like BuzzFeed and Upworthy, known for their super-successful clickbait headlines, take advantage of a casual, conversational tone.
  • Call to action. It’s never a bad idea to try a call to action in your email subject line. While many opt-out due to limited character space, call to actions may improve open rates. Even a simple “Go!” can serve as a motivating call to action. If you’re not sure what makes a great call to action, check out this post on call to action examples by Dan for some help.
  • Using You/Your. While name-calling is on the out, it’s still considered a best practice to use “you” and “your” wording to speak directly and comfortably with readers.
  • Put Yourself in the “From” field. Keep your “from” section professional and consistent for business subject lines. This isn’t this place to be a goof ball – with so much spam floods, users want to see that you are a legitimate and trusted source. Most business emails put their brand name in the “from” field, or go with something along the lines of “John Smith from InvitaCorp”.
  • Always A/B test subject lines. You should A/B test everything you can get your fingers on, email subject lines included.
  • Pay attention to the preview. The email preview that follows the subject line is a valuable piece of property, and yet so many businesses ignore it or let it get filled with garbage text.
  • See something you like? Steal it! All the world’s greatest artists are thieves – they “borrow” from others, building on existing works to create their own. Don’t be afraid to break bad. If you see great subject lines that you think will work for your business, nab them! Tweak them a bit and try them on for size. Remember, imitation is flattery, so flatter the hell out of the best email subject lines.

Low Open Rates?

Having trouble with your email open rates? Working on your subject lines will help, but there may be other factors at play, such as:

  • Is the email viewable? If your email doesn’t read well on a user’s device, they won’t bother trying to decipher it.
  • Are you being a pest? If you’ve been emailing folks every day, they may be fed up with you and won’t be as likely to open your emails if you’ve been making yourself an annoyance.
  • When did you send it? Many people don’t check their emails as often on the weekend.
  • Quality of your email list. Is this a solid, targeted email list? If your list isn’t high-quality, it may reflect in your open rates.

Four Great Email Examples For Sales Prospecting

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In today’s selling trend, the ability to deliver an effective sales email is one of the most important step toward your success.

The phone marketing is still a critical channel, yet it is highly inefficient. It takes 22.5 dials before you can have a real conversation or transaction. As a matter of fact, Coca Cola just discontinued their corporate voicemail. Nowadays, connecting people via email  is more important than ever and the industry is responding. This is also supported by the rise of numerous sales email applications such as YesWare, ToutApp, and SalesLoft.

On the other hand, corporate buyers are getting more emails than before, with the combination of sales emails and those being sent via marketing automation. It means, while email is essential, your email will be ignored if you are unable to pierce through the high volume of emails your prospects receive daily with compelling email copy that provides value to your prospect.

In today’s post, we will explore four good examples of effective prospecting emails sent by real salespeople and sales development representatives. There are many critical tactics associated with the successful sales emails, but there are three notions to notice:

  • Create buyer-centric email copy. Every message from voicemails, emails, social outreach, and live call should focus on the prospect, not you. They must answer the question: Why is it worth their time to speak with you? As you will see from the examples below, these emails are carefully crafted to connect with the buyer and not necessarily sell the product.
  • Research the prospect to craft a personalised message. It’s very difficult to create buyer-centric email copy without researching the prospect. Great sales emails typically reflect a deep understanding of who the prospect is and what they care about. Before writing your sales email, try to identify 2-3 key findings that you can mention and tie your value prop to. The emails below are great examples of emails written following prospect research.
  • Combine touches within seconds of each other. Leaving a voicemail within seconds of your email will increase the likelihood of your prospect opening and responding to your email. This important best practice is not represented in the emails below but is worth including as you send your buyer-centric prospecting emails. 

Without further ado, let’s take a closer look at these email examples:

1. How Twilio Leverages Ideas in their Outbound Prospecting Emails

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The goal of this email was to get an executive level meeting with Starbucks. The sales development representative, Emerald Maravilla, wanted to start at the top (the CEO). Her approach was to email Howard Schultz a short list of new ideas for Starbucks that could be delivered using her company, Twilio. Before writing the email, she obviously had experience with the Starbucks brand, but nonetheless performed deep research on Starbucks to understand their current initiatives. That research enabled her to propose specific ways that Starbucks could leverage Twilio.

Emerald’s approach is a great way to interest executives. Executives respect new ideas. As the sales author Jill Konrath once said: “People respond to ideas even if they are wrong.” This type of email requires heavy research and thought. As such, it is a tactic best suited for high value prospects.

Key points:

  • Show the prospect that you are excited. In the opening paragraph, she uses the word explicitly: “excited.” Prospects have a choice on whether to spend time with you and what she is saying to the buyer is: “I have been thinking about you and I am excited to share my ideas.”
  • Come up with a set of interesting ideas crafted for their business. The ideas Emerald shares in this email are very specific to Starbucks’ business and are actually a fun read. You can imagine the reader getting excited about the possibilities.
  • Close it with value. Many outbound emails default to “setting up a demo to show you more” but the focus on Emerald’s close is to continue “idea-sharing” and to talk about how other companies are using Twilio. A hard close on a sales presentation would not be nearly as effective as her approach.

2. How YesWare Creates a Business Case for Engagement

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This email came from Dakota McKenzie from YesWare. Whereas Emerald chose to share ideas, Dakota makes a business case for us to engage. Like Emerald’s email, it is thoughtful and full of respect. Step one in any relationship is to earn trust and Dakota earns mine by showing the audience that he has a deep understanding of their business and has thought about why we should we connect.

Key points:

  • Tell the prospect that you should talk whether they buy something from you or not. That is what Dakota’s first sentence said to me. Dakota set the table for this email by emphasizing how much we have in common and tells me he is focused on the value of an equal business relationship.
  • Provide a reason “why” we should engage. Dakota provides a business case for us to connect. When you read it, you get the impression that deep research was involved. In actuality, Dakota was able to take publicly available information and tie it back to YesWare. This results in a very compelling case for engagement.
  • Close for a business relationship versus a product relationship. The emphasis of Dakota’s close is on exploring how we can work together to achieve common goals. Based on the rest of the email, I don’t see why I wouldn’t.

3. How Kapost Makes Trial Follow-Up Emails Buyer-Centric

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For many organisations, this type of follow-up email is canned and sent via automation. For many lower-value trials, a canned response is probably the right thing to do. However, if your goal is to actually talk to someone and ultimately sell to them, the most effective strategy is to craft a compelling, buyer-centric email. What I really liked about this email was the amount of research that Teddy did on me in advance of writing the email. It gave me the impression that the email was a personal note, which stands out from the rest of the canned trial emails one receives on a daily basis.

Key points:

  • Connect with the buyer immediately. As with most inbound emails where a buyer has performed some type of activity, Teddy mentions the fact that I downloaded a trial in the first sentence. What got me to keep reading was the fact that he mentioned me in the second sentence and in this case, he mentioned the blog post. Because the email was about me, the reader was immediately compelled to read on.
  • Provide a personal perspective. Today, many sales emails mention your content (if you create content). They might write: ‘I loved your piece on XXX.” What made Teddy’s email different was the fact that he wrote a very personal opinion on the topic the particular topic.
  • Deliver a more specific call-to-action. Maybe Teddy didn’t want to connect, but he had his audience gripped and then let them off the hook by only offering to answer questions if they had any.

4. How Switch Merge Uses Video in Emails to Increase Response

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This email is a bit different than the others. The company, Switch Merge, had identified the right executive to connect with and just had to get their attention. While this email is more product-centric than the other 3 examples in this blog post, it still represents a personalised way to engage with hard-to-reach prospects. The technology that powered this email is actually provided by Switch Merge and it allows organisations to take explainer videos and personalise them to the recipient such as including name, company, etc. These types of emails can be very effective with busy executives who can view an explainer video and understand who you are and why you are unique in a quick, visually appealing way.

Key points:

  • Personalise the experience. This video stands out from others because it is personalised to the prospect’s name, company, and title. These personal touches give the prospect the feeling that this video was for them.
  • Deliver a call-to-action in your video content. Sales people often send content without a significant call-to-action: “Here is a piece of content you might find interesting.” In this case, the call-to-action is built into the video to help support your real request — to get a meeting.
  • Use video viewer data to determine your next steps. Many sales email tools are powerful because they tell the sales person whether someone opened or viewed their email. In this case, the sales person will know whether someone actually viewed the video and can continue to pursue this prospect knowing they have a high-level understanding of what you do.

Conclusion

These emails are distinct in their own ways, but they offer great examples of how to deliver a differentiated email experience to the prospect. Not surprisingly, each of these emails achieved successful outcomes. Choose the one that suits you and see what will happen in the future.

5 Ways To Make Your Call to Action Effective

hey youIn every effort we commit, our highest hopes is to convert. For us marketers of the digital age, conversion is the ultimate objective, the end goal of all our endeavours, the mecca of everything that is commerce. It is the sole subject that gives justification to everything that we’ve been doing up to this very moment.

How do we convert?

First, we call, we announce, then we cajole. We convince customers that what we are up to is a big deal for them. This process, this act of cajoling potential customers into buying, is called Call To Action.

First and foremost, what is Call To Action? As the name suggests, a “call to action” (CTA) is an instruction from us for the site user to do a certain deed. This may be to submit his or her email address to subscribe to some trendy marketing program, or simply to click a button to download apps or other brochures.

To make it even simpler, a CTA is where we convince the audience to buy whatever it is we are trying to sell. It is the path leading to our virtual check-out counter. From a marketing perspective, a user who follows the CTA is a conversion.

Simply put, your website must have a CTA. Your conversion rate, the very life of your business, depends on the effectiveness of your CTA. Below are some of important techniques gathered and compiled from experiences and testimonials of several marketing experts across the globe. These tried and tested methods will help you create an effective CTA.

1. Create the need

Creating a need is a basic rule in advertising. It’s like laying the foundation of commerce. It puts the user in a position where he has virtually no choice but to belong to those who are in need of your product.

Techrepublic.com makes a very good example in their site by providing a statement beneath an email submission field that says: “No, I don’t want to stay on top of my game.” Users will think twice before ignoring this statement. It will help them think that they need to subscribe to be “on top of their game.” What follows is that users input their email addresses and click the submit button.

2. Create urgency

This is also a basic advertising technique that has been used by sellers all across the world for many years. Like the creation of need, where users are made to believe that they need your product, this follow-up technique makes them think that they need your product NOW.

By using phrases like “limited offer”, “expiration date”, and “order now while supply lasts”, users are made to believe that their urgent action is needed; that the sooner they act, the better it would be for them. An effective CTA would make the user believe that they have to act now, or there is no more hope for them.

3. Make it visible

A good CTA can be seen right away amid all the content of the page. Overloading the page with information and putting the CTA in the midst of all the content clutter will only make it hard for the user to see it.

The point is making the CTA separate from other content, so it calls the user’s attention immediately. Consider placing the CTA above the fold of the page. By doing this, it calls the attention of the user even before the user begins scrolling down. Consider also putting some white spaces around the CTA for it to get more attention.

4. Offer some extra stuff

A little extra would not do any harm. In fact, users will feel encouraged if they feel they are getting free stuff in the process. It makes them think they are getting the upperhand in the deal, that they are not getting ripped off.

Consider this copy: Sign-up and get a FREE tshirt! When users see this deal, they are most likely to sign-up just because of the free tshirt alone that you are offering. To us marketers, it kind of speeds up the process of conversion.

5. Use distinct color

For the CTA to stand above all the content, it is necessary to use different colours from the one being used in the page’s theme. It doesn’t have to be an opposite contrast of the overall colour theme. On the contrary, even though the CTA must be different from the rest of the content, its colour should also complement the overall palette being used.

Aesthetically, it must not hurt the user’s visual discipline. A lot of resources in the Web offer colour palettes that will help us decide on the right amount of combinations that we can use when designing the CTA.

Eight Elements Of A Superb Email Subject Line

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Email subject is one of the most fundamental aspects in email marketing. Most of the time, emails with poorly written subjects are automatically placed in the Spam folder. Furthermore, they can tarnish your reputation as a professional.

Email is one of your best channels for staying in touch with and engaging customers. If your customers aren’t opening your emails, then you’re missing tons of sales and relationship-building opportunities. Without further ado, here are eight elements of a superb email subject line that you might want to incorporate in your company’s email marketing strategy:

1. Self-Interest Factor

These are your bread and butter subject lines – you should be using them most frequently. They are usually direct and speak to a specific benefit your audience will gain by opening the email. Self-interest subject lines also help pre-qualify openers by giving them a clue about your email’s body content.

2. Curiosity

If self-interest subject lines work because they communicate a direct benefit of opening the email, curiosity-based ones succeed for the exact opposite reason. These peak the interest of subscribers without giving away too much information, leading to higher opens. Be careful though, because curiosity-based subject lines can get old fast and are the most likely to miss their mark.

3. Offer Freebies

People love free stuffs and would like to spend more if there is an “incentive”, no matter how small it is. So does your email list. When you are giving something away or selling something your subscribers would be interested in, directly stating that in your subject line is a great way to convince them to open the email and learn more.

4. Urgency/Scarcity Factor

This is the most powerful type of subject line you have at your disposal. Subject lines that communicate urgency and scarcity tell readers they must act now. Too many of these can lead to list exhaustion so use sparingly and, of course, only when there is truly a deadline, limited quantity or limited availability.

5. Humanity

Sometimes you just need to thank your subscribers or send them a holiday greeting. Don’t forget to remind your list about the person or people behind your products.

6. News Update

Keeping your audience informed about new developments in your field builds authority and keeps your open rates high. These subject lines often work well when combined with a curiosity element.

7. Social Proof

A fundamental characteristic of humans is that we look to the behavior of others when making decisions. You can leverage this in your email subject lines by mentioning individual’s success stories, familiar names, or highlighting how many people are already using a product or service.

8. Tell a Story

Telling a story, or at least teasing the beginning of one, in your subject line is a unique way to highlight a benefit and get the open rate you’re looking for.

Creating A Perfect Email Marketing Campaign (Infographic)

Despite of its infamy regarding the big number of spam, email is still one of the most effective tool for direct marketing.

Email marketing has become an increasingly viable and credible platform from which to promote products. Now, it is a crucial tool used throughout the business world, whether it is B2B or B2C. Still, email marketing is only useful if you’re able to create a well-fashioned email with a persuasive lead. If you are unable to surpass this fundamental hurdle, your efforts will simply be wasted.

Email marketing naturally reaches the largest sample of respondents, therefore doing your utmost to perfect a marketing email will send your click through rates sky high, and you will see tangible improvements in your traffic levels.

Take a look at this infographic to learn more about the art of creating a perfect email campaign.

creating-a-perfect-email-infographic

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Twelve Secrets Of Human Brain That Can Be Utilised For Your Digital Marketing (Infographic)

Our brain and background knowledge affect the way we treat our marketing approach.

In today’s infographic, we elaborate twelve amazing facts about human brain that digital marketers must use to improve their marketing performance.

Here are some key highlights:

  • Aim for the gut reaction. Your subject line and header text work simultaneously to persuade people so they will open your marketing email. Use these spaces to get your point across at an emotional level. Use words that create excitement, urgency or even low-grade anxiety.
  • Design for scanning. We’re not reading in our inboxes anymore. Imagine your marketing email without any text at all. If you can manage to add a story or stir an emotion with just your images, you’re on the right track.
  • Make it easy to act. Consider including a face that looks toward your call to action. Close-ups work best, and eye-tracking studies show will look where they’re looking.

Here is an infographic that covers more detailed information on this topic.

12 Secrets of the Human Brain To Use In Your Marketing

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