Archive | Google Adwords RSS feed for this section

The Most Expensive Google AdWords Keywords in Australia

Web Tools Toolbox Online Website Developer Kit

Anyone who has had experience running Google AdWords campaigns knows it can be an expensive game, and over the past few years has become even more so.

Unfortunately, this trend will only continue, with demand increasing, and more people turning to online advertising mediums from more traditional options. Now, many of marketers have seen the data coming out on the most expensive keywords. Head over to Wordstream to check it out by yourself.

However, what’s the AdWords cost over here in Australia? Here is a list of some of the most expensive Google keywords. As long as you are not in any of these industries, it should make you feel a little better about your AdWords budgets.

Gambling/Betting

  • Gambling – up to $32
  • Sports Betting: $17.98
  • Betting: $31.85

Travel Insurance

  • Travel insurance – up to $18
  • Travel Insurance Australia: $17.34
  • Travel Insurance: $13.47
  • Annual family travel insurance: $16.42

Real Estate

  • Commercial real estate – up to $15
  • Investment property management: $13.00
  • Renting office space: $15.48
  • Offices for lease: $11.49

Superannuation

  • Superannuation – up to $20
  • SMSF: $22.07
  • DIY super fund: $20.58
  • Superannuation: $11.56

Air Conditioners

  • Air conditioners & Heating – up to $9
  • Commercial air conditioning: $7.85
  • Air conditioning installation: $7.22
  • industrial air conditioners: $8.61

Life Insurance

  • Life insurance – up to $150
  • Life Insurance Quotation: $99.27
  • Life Insurance: $96.94
  • Life Insurance co: $150.30

Share Trading

  • Share trading – up to $58
  • CFD Trading: $48.47
  • Online Trading: $46.41
  • Online Stock Broker: $42.61

Health Insurance

  • Health insurance – up to $61
  • Health Insurance: $48.93
  • Health Insurance Australia: $44.23
  • Australian Health Insurance: $60.70

Injury Lawyer

  • Personal injury lawyer – up to $119
  • Personal Injury lawyer: $45.48
  • Car accident settlement: $118.27
  • Personal injury law firm: $78.77

Credit Cards

  • Credit card – up to $43
  • Credit Cards: $25.97
  • Low rate credit cards: $56.72
  • Credit card online: $49.51

Search Engine Optimisation

  • SEO – up to $58
  • SEO: $26.05
  • Search engine optimisation services: $57.61
  • Melbourne search engine optimisation: $35.27

Note: The data above comes directly from Google AdWords Keyword Planner.

Google Is Providing The Simulator Tools For AdWords Mobile and First Page Bids

google-mobile-bid-simulator

Recently, Google introduced a new bid adjustment simulator for mobile in AdWords and a new first page bid estimates.

Optimising bids can be tough thing to do. It can also take a great deal of effort to achieve performance targets. However, the two new tools from Google should enable advertisers to set better mobile and first position bids.

The mobile bid adjustment simulator shows how changing a mobile bid adjustment could affect impressions, clicks and spend. The simulator will show estimated impact for both mobile bid adjustment increases and decreases. Here’s how it might work:

“Let’s say you have a 20% mobile bid adjustment and drove 1,150 mobile clicks over the last 7 days as a result. Using the mobile bid adjustment simulator, you can see that setting a 50% mobile bid adjustment might have generated an estimated 1,600 clicks on mobile devices — that’s 39% more mobile clicks and 450 more visitors to your website!”

The company has also added first position bid estimates to complement the existing first page estimates and top-of-page estimates. It shows the bid is likely needed for an ad to be shown in the first position on the first page of results.

“The Bulker”: A 10 Minutes Google AdWords Workout Infographic (Part 3 of 3)

the-new-adwords-logo

Every serious online marketers will consider Google AdWords as the “holy grail” of marketing tools.

The fact that it is suitable for advertisers to work with third-party digital agencies and evaluate what a ‘management fee’ has made Google AdWords the perfect tool for simple and direct marketing. Still, those who have not refined their management process and feeling a little bit over committed after noticing a lot of workload looking down at them has learned a great way to maintain multiple campaigns can get tricky.

The following 10 minute AdWords workout infographic can help you to manage your AdWords more wisely. The workouts will be broken down into three parts according to the goals. They are The Slimmer (for those who want to bring their AdWords account back to its peak performance), The Maintainer (for those who want to keep their performance going strong and effective) and The Bulker (for those whose AdWords account is awesome enough and want to reap more traffic and conversions). Choose the one that suits your condition.

In this post we will deal with the third goal, which is:

3. The Bulker

This workout method fits for those who want to ‘flex their biceps’ by using positive data to improve performance and show their ‘auction insight’ competitors what they are truly made of. It is not for just ‘heavy weights’ guys, but for those wanting to grow their campaign in the right direction. It makes sense to add more bulk to the campaign after profitability has been achieved via ‘slimmer’ and ‘maintainer’ workouts. Once you have ensured everything is working, the only way is up.

Take a look at the infographic below for more detailed information.

the-bulker-adwords-workout-infographic

Click to Enlarge

Infographic credit: Klientboost and Unbounce.

“The Maintainer”: A 10 Minutes Google AdWords Workout Infographic (Part 2 of 3)

the-new-adwords-logo

Every serious online marketers will consider Google AdWords as the “holy grail” of marketing tools.

The fact that it is suitable for advertisers to work with third-party digital agencies and evaluate what a ‘management fee’ has made Google AdWords the perfect tool for simple and direct marketing. Still, those who have not refined their management process and feeling a little bit over committed after noticing a lot of workload looking down at them has learned a great way to maintain multiple campaigns can become tricky.

The following 10 minute AdWords workout infographic can help you to manage your AdWords more wisely. The workout will be broken down into three parts according to the goals. They are The Slimmer (for those who want to bring their AdWords account back to its peak performance), The Maintainer (for those who want to keep their performance going strong and effective) and The Bulker (for those whose AdWords account is awesome enough and want to reap more traffic and conversions). Choose the one that suits your condition.

In this post we will deal with the second goal, which is:

2. The Maintainer

Do you want to look like The Flash of AdWords Management who runs through the AdWords campaign everyday in a speed of sound while making sure a client is getting true value for money clicks, views, engagement and more at the same time? If the answer is yes, so this approach is the right one for you. This workout’s logical goal during optimisation is to improve audience ‘relevance’ by ensuring a keyword the advertiser is being found for is offered on the linked website and communicating the information a potential buyer requires in short text or shopping adverts, and extensions.

Take a look at the infographic below for more detailed information.

the-maintainer-adwords-workout-infographic

Click to Enlarge

Infographic credit: Klientboost and Unbounce.

“The Slimmer”: A 10 Minutes Google AdWords Workout Infographic (Part 1 of 3)

the-new-adwords-logo

Every serious online marketers will consider Google AdWords as the “holy grail” of marketing tools.

The fact that it is suitable for advertisers to work with third-party digital agencies and evaluate what a ‘management fee’ has made Google AdWords the perfect tool for simple and direct marketing. Still, those who have not refined their management process and feeling a little bit over committed after noticing a lot of workload looking down at them has learned a great way to maintain multiple campaigns can get tricky.

The following 10 minute AdWords workout infographic can help you to manage your AdWords more wisely. The workouts will be broken down into three parts according to the goals. They are The Slimmer (for those who want to bring their AdWords account back to its peak performance), The Maintainer (for those who want to keep their performance going strong and effective) and The Bulker (for those whose AdWords account is awesome enough and want to reap more traffic and conversions). Choose the one that suits your condition.

In this post we will deal with the first goal, which is:

1. The Slimmer

The Slimmer workout method is suitable for those who want to chomp through the campaign and rolling it back to a more manageable state. It uses “Cut-Your-Losses” approach with a reasonable goal in mind. Take a look at the infographic below for more detailed information.

the-slimmer-adwords-workout-infographic

Click to Enlarge

Infographic credit: Klientboost and Unbounce.

How To Successfully Take Over A PPC Account

Google-adwords-logo

If you work in an agency and have handled an existing account that you plan to build on rather than start over from scratch, you’ll know this situation comes with a certain set of issues and things you need to take into consideration.

You may be wondering, “Why not start a new one?” Well, there are several reasons you might not want to completely scrap the existing account structure:

  • You would set the account up the same way.
  • It makes sense for the client in terms of the reporting they need and/or their budgets.
  • You would like to build on the existing history in the campaigns and not have any quality score fluctuations.
  • The client needs to retain all of the old campaigns.

There are often clear reasons why accounts need to be restructured. Still, from time to time, you will come across a scenario where it’s best to build on the existing account structure.

Important Points To Consider

There are some points to consider when building on an existing account. Each of them will address their own unique issues; yet, there are a few of the main things to consider when adopting this approach:

1.Settings

Make sure you have audited these across all existing accounts to know what’s going on at the backbone level of the campaigns. If you don’t check these over, you could easily build into a campaign that was set up entirely incorrectly in the first place.

However, if you have certain setting preferences, you can run all accounts on accelerated budgets rather than standard. Then, make sure you’re aware of what’s going on and make changes where necessary. Check all the little details as well, such as making sure the Google Display Network isn’t switched on within a search campaign and that the correct languages are being targeted.

2. Structure

Often, the main structure might make sense to you. Still, at ad group level, things are not as you would expect. For example, you can build all match types into the same ad group, whereas many agencies build out separate ad groups per match type, in which case you need to make a plan for which ad group you’re going to merge all the keywords into.

In this situation, you should take the better performing ad group in terms of conversion volumes, targets and click-through rate, and then merge the terms into this ad group so you’re able to build on the history that is already in place.

In some instances, there might be separate campaigns for different match types, so you’ll need to consider the same approach here, too. It’s recommended to create a spreadsheet with all the campaign names and then putting together a plan based on historical statistics for what needs to be merged into what.

Another situation you might come across is where there are many campaigns set up – too many for the budget that you’re planning to use – many of which are only receiving a few impressions per day. In this case, you’ll need to add into your merge plan that you intend to join these together into one campaign, either building into the best-performing one or starting a new one.

You can then simply use prefixes in your ad group naming conventions to be able to identify how each group is performing. During this process, you may also need to merge several ad groups together if you find you have a similar situation at the ad group level, and delete any all-time zero impression keywords in the process.

3. Keywords

Sometimes, you’ll find that keyword coverage is good, but could do with a little expansion and refreshing. Take a look through the search query reports over a lengthy period of time and see if there are any new key themes to be built out. Additionally, check the website to see if new areas need to be built.

Learn about the account you’re taking over and what bids/ad positions have been tested previously. Then, depending on whether the client wants a low-risk takeover or a more “guns blazing” takeover, you can plan your approach accordingly.

Remember that when adding your new keywords, they’ll take the default ad group bid, which might not have been changed in a while. Make any necessary adjustments there if needed. You will need to decide what to do with any match types you’re not happy with in the account. Try adding in modified broad match to areas with low volume traffic and ensure you have enough phrase and exact match coverage of your main keywords.

You should carry out a full review on any broad match keywords especially, and ensure you have the right flow of traffic happening in the account through adding more negative keywords in at ad group level and refining your match types.

4. Ad Copy

ad-copy

Not all campaigns you’ll take over will be completely terrible. Some of them will be working just “ok” and may just need refining and more active testing in order to achieve further success. In this case, you should mark the top performing ad in each ad group with a label and keeping this ad switched on during the merge. Then, add in two of your own ads for further testing so you can see differences in performance. Label these two ads as your own, and this will make it really easy to filter by label and see which ads are working best once you have enough data.

Make sure you’re also checking into which ad extensions are currently set up. If site links are there but descriptions are not in place, add these in and further build on the extensions. It’s important to check seller reviews, too, as these can often go unnoticed and may have been disapproved for some time — hence, an update might be the best option.

5. Bidding

bidding

You need to think about your keyword bidding strategy; however, you also need to think more widely than this. If you don’t check at this stage what bid strategies are currently enabled for device, location, time of day, and audience, then you might miss some vital information.

Once you have come to grips with the existing strategy, analyse the data again. It could be that because of keyword adjustments you’re making, you’d like to start afresh with some bid multipliers, basing them on data from the new mix of keywords instead.

In other instances, it could be that you just need to make bid adjustments again based on the analysis that you have carried out. If you can see, for example, that mobile has never been tested in the account and the client now has a responsive site, switch this on and test it out.

6. Tracking

Check that the account has not been over counting. This is really important, as some accounts in the past are double counting with both AdWords and Google Analytics tracking, or have AdWords code on incorrect pages on their site.

In addition to this, check that sales value is being pulled in through the Google AdWords conversion tracking type and take time to understand any other tracking methods that are currently in place. Always question the tracking in place and make sure it’s set up as you would like before adjusting anything else in the account.

If you notice that the tracking was incorrect previously be sure to notify the client ASAP as this will mean that once corrected you’ll be seeing potentially big fluctuations in results that you’re reporting.

Conclusion

These are just a few tips for things to think about when taking over an existing AdWords campaign. Make sure you discuss merge tactics with your client and let them know that even with the less risky plans, there will always be fluctuations in statistics when you take over their account. This may cause changes to their existing cost per click, traffic and conversions.

How To Track ROI With Conversion Tracking In Google AdWords

Google-adwords-logo

Most business owners would like to know which of their keywords best leads to clicks and conversions. However, many of them don’t know how to do it.

The answer lies on a simple conversion tracking tool. The following free tool in AdWords can show the advertisers what happen after customers click on your ad, whether they purchased a product, called from a mobile phone, or downloaded the app.

By knowing this, they will also know which of their keywords, ads, ad groups, and campaigns are good for the perpetuity of the business, allowing them to invest more wisely and help them to increase the return on investment (ROI).

In the video below, Google will tell you how to set up conversion tracking for conversions that happen online, such as website purchases and sign-ups, mobile app downloads, and calls to your business from mobile phones.

The Future of Paid Search (Infographic)

Search engine’s paid search service has put itself as a highly viable, cost effective marketing channel. In 2011, paid search spending is expected to reach $34 billion. Worldwide, paid search is a $34 billion industry. In this infographic, The Website Marketing Group team will briefly explore all about paid search: it’s current state, where it’s going, and how the largest paid search vendors, such as Google & Bing, have divided up the market.

Facts and stats about paid search:

  • Worldwide, paid search is a $34 billion industry.
  • By 2016, paid search is expected to grow by 75% to become a $61.1 billion industry.
  • Since 2006, the amount spent on paid search has increased by 250%.
  • Google AdWords has a declining return on investment (ROI), down 12% as of 1/2011.
  • Bing & Yahoo Advertising has an increasing return on investment (ROI), up 10% as of 1/2011.
  • Paid search is currently bigger than radio, outdoor and cinema advertising.
  • The average cost per click is up 11% (year over year) for Google, and 4% for Bing.

Google Adwords Enhanced Its Campaign Strategy

 

Google has announced what is being described as one of the most fundamental modification to Adwords in years. 

The focus of this modification is to enable advertisers to target people at the right time, in the right place, with the right ad and call-to-action. Effectively, the structuring of Adwords campaigns is becoming more mobile independent, removing the ability to have specific devices, like tablet or desktop targeted campaigns.

This is surely a big and important update for any advertiser who puts their hope in PPC.

Here are a few important points to consider/ changes that will affect your campaigns. For instance, it will no longer be possible to have separate Adwords campaigns for mobile. Marketers will have to use one campaign to span all devices.

To allow advertisers to optimise mobile activity separately to desktop activity, there will be a multiple bid adjustments available at keyword level. Regular bids will be used for determining desktop Ad Rank while bid adjustments will be applied to that regular bid to determine mobile Ad Rank.

The bid adjustments will range from -100% (which will turn mobile advertising off) to +300% which will bid four times the amount of the desktop targeting.

So, in situations where an advertiser wants to secure a high position on desktop but the advert is not to appear on mobile, a relatively high bid should be placed, but with a bid adjustment of -100%.

Conversely if mobile is the focus over desktop, a relatively low bid should be set with a high multiplier. In addition to this, other bid adjustments can be implemented based on time of day (as we currently have via ‘day parting’) and proximity. That is, the ability to adjust bids upwards or downwards based on the searcher’s physical location.

All of these multipliers can be ‘stacked’. For example, if a business wanted to target customers who are searching within a certain distance of one of their stores, within business hours, on a mobile phone, bids could be adjusted upwards for mobile, proximity and time ensuring that they have the maximum possibility of getting their advert in front of that potential customer.

Targeting can be enhanced further still through different advert formats. Adverts can still be created and optimised differently for mobile and desktop searches by specifying which adverts you want to use for mobile and which for desktops.

Different adverts can have different features based on the context and circumstance of the searcher. Worth noting is the fact that if only ‘mobile preferred’ adverts exist they will show for desktop searches as well as for mobile searches and vice-versa.

Google’s Adwords blog demonstrates this with a couple of examples:

  • “A breakfast cafe wants to reach people nearby searching for “coffee” or “breakfast” on a smartphone. Using bid adjustments, with three simple entries, they can bid 25% higher for people searching a half-mile away, 20% lower for searches after 11am, and 50% higher for searches on smartphones. These bid adjustments can apply to all ads and all keywords in one single campaign”
  • “A national retailer with both physical locations and a website can show ads with click-to-call and location extensions for people searching on their smartphones, while showing an ad for their e-commerce website to people searching on a PC — all within a single campaign.”

There are also some reporting updates in line with the new features of Enhanced campaigns. Now, specific interactions can be classed as conversions such as phone calls that are generated from a click-to-call ad, that last more than 60 seconds.

Situation based data combined with device and keyword level data will help provide a much clearer picture of the customer journey. These are insights that marketers have long wished for.

The option to migrate to these ‘enhanced’ campaign settings will be available almost immediately. However, it’s likely that only select accounts will see it initially, with it being added to more over the coming weeks and months. Once the advertiser is happy to make the transition, assuming the option exists in the account, they should seek to enable the enhanced set up.

There are a few important points of caution here though. Once advertisers have enabled the new set up, they won’t be able to return to the previous version. It is important that as much advanced preparation is done as possible to minimise any negative impact.

PPC advertisers only have a few months to get used to this new way of working. As things stand currently, accounts that aren’t migrated by the end of June 2013 will be automatically migrated by Google.

Enhanced campaigns are not applicable to the GDN. Such campaigns will continue to operate as they are currently. One final consideration is the impact this has on 3rd party tool providers, particularly analytics packages.

Perhaps unsurprisingly, Google’s Double Click is ready and able to manage, and take these updates into account. However, we would advise that advertisers carefully review the impact this change has on any other tools that interface with, or track data from Adwords.

As with all Google updates their message here is all about improving the experience for their end users. It could be seen as Google giving a helping hand to advertisers to increase their investment in and commitment to mobile advertising.

For advertisers this means context and situation based targeting is to become an integral part of Adwords. To date features such as mobile specific targeting have been relatively siloed and easy to opt out of. With focus of targeting to be more about the user and their circumstance and less about the specific keyword they searched for, this is no longer the case.

This will of course also likely increase Google’s revenues – specifically those generated through mobile searches. Google has worked with advertisers to try and promote mobile advertising for years, but it often provides less return in comparison to the effort involved when compared to desktop advertising.

More relevant adverts will get clicked more and as such increase spend, and much of this growth is likely to be from mobile as a result of this change.

Google’s own stats help provide a little more context as to why situation based targeting (more specifically mobile) is such a focus:

  • In 2013 more people will be using mobile phones than PCs to get online.
  • Mobile searches have grown 400% since 2010.
  • There will be 1 mobile device for every person on earth by 2015.
  • 95% of smartphone users have searched for local information.
  • 61% of users call a business after searching, and 59% visit the location.
  • 70% of mobile users have compared product prices on their phones.
  • 50% of mobile searches led to a purchase.

‘The year of mobile’ has been a rallying cry that we’ve heard almost every year that search marketing has existed, and perhaps this is the update that will finally make it a reality. With the use of smartphones growing significantly, it is an obvious market for Google to target aggressively.

However, the search giant will have to demonstrate the real, rather than hypothetical benefits of this change. It relies on the end user having a positive experience and finding a use for the adverts that they are being served. That means that advertisers need to be willing to invest the extra time and effort into campaign management to ensure their ads are optimised for relevancy. It is Google’s biggest challenge.

Introducing Google’s New Remarketing Tags

Managing your remarketing lists (or getting started with remarketing) is now easier and more flexible than ever. Google has upgraded their AdWords remarketing tag, so you only need to place it once across your entire site and use these remarketing lists to run campaigns on the Google Display Network. With this new solution, you can then define as many lists as you like in AdWords, for example, pages where the URL contains the word “web marketing.”

New on Google’s AdWords? Visit our site on The Website Marketing Group for more service from managing your Google ads strategy to making the best SEO for your site.